Life

Waiting for the Sun

Standing at the edge of the boreal forest. A group of spruce and poplars lined up covered thickly with frost and snow. Waiting for the sun to return.


This is the strangest life

I have ever known.

The Doors

That’s how I feel these days. After a year of hiding behind a mask, being trapped inside it is time for life to return. Life as we know it, only better. There are silver linings on the horizon, light at the end of the tunnel. But it’s not quite there, yet.

Til next time.

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Life

Your Table Is Ready

Some of us haven’t heard that sentence in a while. State, county, or city mandates had prohibited indoor service at restaurants at times during the pandemic.


Winter Patio

I consider not being able to dine in a minor inconvenience. Others view this is an unconstitutional deprivation of their human rights. Thus, the pandemic has deepened the rift in our society. How do you live with these absurdities of our times?

Here is some advice from Albert Camus, who received the Nobel Prize in Literature at the age of 44.

Accepting the absurdity of everything around us is one step, a necessary experience:

it should not become a dead end.

Albert Camus

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Life

Season’s Greetings

Wishing you all healthy holidays.

This year has been a mess, thank you very much. “2020” had such a good ring to it…

They say we should count our blessings. Yes, there were things to be grateful for.

I was fortunate enough to spend many days in the woods. The only way to keep my sanity.

Now winter is upon us. On a good day the sun will paint a mesmerizing picture of the boreal forest.

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Life

Koviashuvik

“Where is home for you?”

How do you answer that question? Is it the place you grew up in? Maybe you call home the place where you currently reside. Either way, in most cases that place comes with a street address and a zip code. A valid mailing address.

Without that, you are almost … nothing.


“Living in the present moment with quiet joy and happiness”


I am looking forward to reading Sam Wright’s book “Koviashuvik – Making a home in the Brooks Range”. Sam was a biologist, priest, and teacher who lived with his wife decades north of the Arctic Circle in a one-room log cabin, reflecting on life, mankind, and wilderness. He called his home Koviashuvik, which means a time and place of joy and happiness. According to Inuit tradition one must live in harmony with nature to experience koviashuvik,

I have not found a street address for Sam’s home, but living in a place with such a beautiful name, I imagine you don’t care that you can’t have a residential phone line, a cable subscription, or even utilities…

Maybe it was just the lack of modern day amenities (and obligations) and the presence of a relatively undisturbed wilderness that made his home a happy place…

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Life

Shine Your Light…

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Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park

“Shine your light
and make a positive impact on the world;
there is nothing so honorable as
helping improve the lives of others.”

Roy T. Bennett


I wish at the end of my days somebody tells me, I had a positive impact on the world. There are many ways to help out others in need. What will you do to make the world a better place?

Black Friday 2018, not a dime spent…

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Life

Respect

September 9, 2001 was a tragic day in human history.

More than 3000 innocent human beings were killed in a heinous attack.

Today, tomorrow, and in the future we should remember that dark day.

No society should encourage or tolerate actions that result in harming other human beings for religious, political, personal or any other reasons.

We as humans have the capacity to make conscious decisions. One prime driving force in all our actions should be to respect and show tolerance towards others.

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Life

Winter Sun

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Winter Sun, Puntilla Lake, Alaska

A year indoors is a journey
along a paper calendar.

A year in outer nature is the
accomplishment of a tremendous ritual.

Henry Beston


Almost 100 years ago Henry Beston spent a whole year in a remote Cape Cod cabin and wrote the The Outermost House. He simply observed and described the change of seasons to an audience that could not afford or endure the hardship and solitude of such an endeavour.

“The world today is sick to its thin blood for the lack of elemental things, for fire before the hands, for water, for air, for the dear earth itself underfoot.”

Even more true today. A great read.

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