Into the Wild

Into the wild – № 2

“The very basic core of a man’s living spirit
is his passion for adventure.”

Jon Krakauer (Into the Wild)


Not all may subscribe to this statement. And adventure means different things to different people. To me an adventure begins with the unknown. Some level of uncertainty. If I step outside in the morning and go look for wildlife or visit a familiar location like this place at Round Prairie I never know what to expect. I have come back to this place many times because there is a magnificent mountain in the distance that gets illuminated by the setting sun in the right conditions. Well, it has happened only once so far. But even on a snowy day, I found snow covered bison, moose nibbling on willows or lovely snow mounds.

What’s your next adventure?

By the way, if you want to read a nice write-up about the adventures of Chris McCandless and his followers visit Eva Hollands essay “Chasing Alexander Supertramp“.

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One Man's Paradise

Into the Wild

“The joy of life comes from our encounters with new experiences, and hence there is no greater joy than to have an endlessly changing horizon, for each day to have a new and different sun.”

Jon Krakauer (Into the Wild)


An amazing book and movie, in my opinion, although the life of Chris McCandless, a.k.a. Alexander Supertramp, has been commented to death.

I have visited this place called Round Prairie now many times during this winter and it shows in a different light every time. On this day I was hoping for sun, but I got snowed on instead. Moose and bison like to hang out in this corner of Yellowstone. Only a handful of trees have managed to grow in this meadow that is surrounded by sheer cliffs and towering mountain tops.

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Quote

Instead of Words

“If I could say it in words
there would be no reason to take photographs.”

inspired by Edward Hopper


Edward Hopper did paint American scenes of daily life. His most famous painting is Nighthawks, an oil on canvas painting that portrays people in a downtown diner late at night. The original can be viewed at the Art Institute of Chicago.

One of his paintings sold for $36 million in 2013, 46 years after his death.

[Art is business, which may not benefit the artist.]

 

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Quote

In no particular order – № 1

“I am pessimistic about the human race because it is too ingenious for its own good. Our approach to nature is to beat it into submission. We would stand a better chance of survival if we accommodated ourselves to this planet and viewed it appreciatively instead of skeptically and dictatorially.”

Elwyn Brooks White


Elwyn Brooks White is the author of Charlotte’s Web and Stuart Little.

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Nature

Blue Blood Winter Super Moon

Supermoon

“Let’s swim to the moon
Let’s climb through the tide
Surrender to the waiting worlds
That lap against our side.”

Jim Morrison


Hey Jim, let me have some of that, too 🙂

Seriously.

The astronomers did it again. With an uncanny precision they have predicted again the occurrence of a rare  event on the night sky. We had a storm approaching last night with high winds and snow fall. I have not done much night photography and I did not expect to see the lunar eclipse on a full moon. So I did not set a timer.

What woke me up at 6 in the morning? Was it Jimmy? I’ll never know.

So I get up, bundle up to walk to the bathhouse and I see a flash going off. Not thinking clearly at this hour I think somebody has set up a camera trap to get a picture of any wildlife on campus. That’s strange. The I see some shapes in the distance moving around near the bunkhouse. Somebody is awake. What are they doing this early? Too early for sunrise, no wolves howling, no class?

Then it dawns on me. I see a blood orange in the sky. It is supposed to be a bright full moon, but it is not. It is a red moon. Bright at the bottom, darker on top.

I fumble with some knobs and settings to capture the rare event.

What would we do without astronomers? Expect the world come to an end? Or go with Jim?

 

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One Man's Paradise

Winter light

“It was the color of someone buying you an ice cream cone for no reason at all.”

Lemony Snicket


Yesterday afternoon I grabbed the snowshoes and poles and hiked out to the Lamar river. The snow was deep. It did not take long and my feet were cold, while my upper body was sweating. I could feel a breeze of cold air in my face. Sunset was still an hour away, so I had time to walk along the frozen edge of the river looking for a suitable foreground. A solitary tree on a hillside across the river piqued my interest.

Sitting on a fallen cottonwood I watched the scenery. There were two coyotes in the distance scampering up the valley. Turning once in a while, making sure I was no thread (or prey?). I imagined the sky turning into a firework of colors. Well, that never happened this evening. Instead, we got winter blues. I had seen those before.

Maybe it was more like someone buying you a warm cup of soup for no reason at all.

[Lemony Snicket is the pen name of Daniel Handler, an American writer, musician and journalist.]

 

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